Rainy day

I thought we would try one of the Buenos Aires walks today, but as usual my luck went home on the last flight, it is pouring down. Never one to be daunted, we set off anyway umbrella in hand.

If we walk in a straight line we cross first the Line B and eventually Line A at Riverdavia. The walk we had planned entailed a stop off at La Violetta and a Ride on Line A, so for me this was the logical place to start.

Of course you need to stop at Rivadavia if this is to happen, we had walked a further five blocks befor I realised we had come too far, so in the rain, we had to turn around and walk back. At Rivadavia we quickly found the subte, but Viv also spotted a shop, so we spent another half hour in there. I remebered what I had read on Sallycats adventures, we had stopped looking for lights, and now they had found us, gracias Carlos. I had no intention of carrying them round with us so we asked what time they closed and said we would be back.

Line A really is from another time, it has wooden coaches with wooden doors, that do not always open without a push. Little glass shades cover the lights, and even the seats are slatted wood.  There is a charm here of a bygone age, if they ever modernise this line they should keep some of the trains as a tourist attraction to loose something so unique would be a shame.

When we jumped off at the penultimate stop, I thought I would check the route and my map. Disaster, I had no glasses. I had them in the lamp shop where I had checked the prices, but no more. Whether I had been pickpocketed or just careless I do not know, but now I could not follow the route.

As we left the station the weather was filthy, nothing for it but to go for a coffee. Over coffee we decided to make the most of it and return for the lamps. On the return the charm of the coaches was somehow lost with the fact we were now packed in like sardines, if someone moved to enter or alight you were pushed and shoved with some force. I can understand why for some los touristas are considered a nuisance here, to these people it is their only transport, not the curiosity it is to us.

Back at the lamp shop, after much, deliberation, and destroying the carefully arranged display, we chose two lamps. Pericles phoned while we were there, but with his busy schedule we could not yet arrange a meet up, and no sign of my glasses either.

The lamps now look wonderful on our new tables, I hope Philippe likes them, after all he has paid for them.

Tonight we are off to Boedo Tango at the invite of Mariela, we have never been befor so it should be interesing. I promisse Viv a steak on the way, we have decided to walk. This is a win win, the money we save on taxis will pay for the meal(well almost) and the walk will get rid of the calories(another almost)

We found a small parilla called Lo de Nelson as usual her they cut the steak in half for us, with two spoons, and we shared a bowl of salad and chips. The portions are just too big for one, and it was only when out with Mirta we learned it is ok to share.

At Boedo we arrived in a huge place with three dance floors, we told the host we did not need a table as we were with Juan althogh she did not know him. We scanned the floors and eventualy saw him dancing, he did not see us (chicas Braziliana son muy linda). Any way at the end of the tanda I followed him to a table, there was so much kissing and back slapping, it is hard to imagine how we have earned this much affection.

Later on Mariela arrived and again there are kisses everywhere. So we spent the rest of the night dancing and talking, until at nearly two, it was time to go. Mariela tried to convince us to take a taxi and we tried to convince Juan and Mariela we are not rich. So we said our goodbyes then enjojed the walk home.

A note here about taxi’s: they are cheap and very convenient, but if you get one heading in the wrong direction (most streets are one way) they will assume you do not know where you are going and lead you a dance. Also we go out every night there is a journey both ways and we ventur out in the day also, so what can start as a fairy cheap taxi fare of say three pounds can soon add up to twenty pounds a day. We are trying to live on a budget, dictated by what we recieved in rental, so we make savings while we can.

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9 Comments

Filed under Argentina, milonga, Uncategorized

9 responses to “Rainy day

  1. Anna

    No more buns for now

  2. tangobob

    Ok I’ll let you have steak then, ham sandwiches sounds boring, nice bit of mustard or pickle should liven them up. So long as it is gingerbread in the oven and not another bun, we miss you at Chester.

  3. Anna

    I was back at my pre-pregnancy shape and weight within 10 days and today I’m wearing trousers that would have been too tight a year ago. I never put on much weight with the pregnancy so I think Leo mainly ate my fat reserves. Lunch in Bangor was ham sandwiches, not very exciting, but I currently have gingerbread in the oven.

  4. tangobob

    That is the problem knowing the stops. The Gia T does not help me much, perhaps you can let me know where you got that CD rom from, then when I am home I can study it

  5. tangobob

    I have to check if you have got that gorgeous figure back before I allow you steak. Whats for lunch in Bangor?

  6. jantango

    Bob,

    Two tips: know the street names two blocks before your stop, and/or watch the block numbers for help. For example, taking the bus to Salon Canning, you get off in the 4500 block of Cordoba. Another option is to ask the driver to tell you when reach your stop and stay in front to get his signal.

    Janis

  7. Anna

    Half a steak sounds great – it is lunchtime here and I’m hungry

  8. tangobob

    Thanks Janis for all that info. I will give some of those routes a try, but the scariest thing for me is not recognising anything from the busses, We caught the 106 one day and even though it passed right by the end of Salguero, I still missed it.
    Anyway it will make a great blog story when we do try, watch this space.

  9. Bob and Viv,

    While you are living on a budget, you are also living like the locals. The buses are a bargain, even with the fare increase earlier this year. Walking is good exercise, but there are times when you will want to hop on a bus and be at the milonga in 15 minutes. The only problem is having enough coins available to pay the $1.25 fare for two people. Each of you can change five pesos for monedas at the bank for a supply of coins to take the buses.

    I checked my CD-ROM of the bus routes and found the ones you need to take for your favorite milongas.

    Club Fulgor: #151 or #140 at the corner of Salguero and Guardia Vieja to Cordoba and Acevedo. A 3-block walk to Loyola 828. The same bus (one previous stop) to Scalabrini Ortiz and Cordoba for a 3-block walk to Salon Canning.

    Boedo Tango: #127 at Corrientes and Medrano stops on San Juan and Sanchez de Loria, practically at the door.

    Centro Region Leonesa: #168 at Corrientes and Salguero to Virrey Cevallos and San Juan, two blocks from the salon at Humberto Primo & Luis Saenz Pena. Take the same bus to Lo de Celia Tango Club (Humberto Primo & Entre Rios).

    Bus lines run on parallel streets, so find the same line one block from where you got off.

    Going to Plaza Bohemia is most convenient by subway. To return home, take #99 at Maipu and Tucuman to Salguero and Cordoba, walk two blocks home.

    Taking the bus has helped me get to know the city better. Once you take the bus a few times, you won’t have to take taxis.

    When you come to my home, take the #151 at Guardia Vieja and Medrano to Combate de los Pozos and Chile (stops between Mexico and Chile); walk up Chile four blocks.

    Janis

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